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Ed Droste

Grizzly Bear Detail New LP 'Painted Ruins,' Release "Mourning Sound" Single, Tour Dates

Music News, New MusicWeston PaganoComment

"I made a mistake / I should have never tried," opens Ed Droste on Grizzly Bear's "Mourning Sound." Accompanied by the announcement of an extensive tour and their fifth full-length album, Painted Ruins, for which this new track is the second single after "Three Rings," that lamentation is oddly juxtaposed with long-awaited excitement.

"Mourning Sound" is a rollicking exploration of each member's contribution to the whole; Christopher Bear and Chris Taylor's drum and bass steadily guide Droste's croons before Daniel Rossen brings it home with the chorus and some trumpeted electric guitar, all over a steady buzz of synth for a very on-brand level of cohesive complexity.

Their major label debut, Grizzly Bear's Painted Ruins is due out August 18 via RCA Records. Their forthcoming tour kicks off this October, for what will be the band's first shows since performing in support of Bernie Sanders last year. The lack of a Chicago date suggests a future festival appearance.

"Mourning Sound," the album art, tracklist, and tour dates are all below. Enjoy it all while you can, because if the new press photo is any indication, poor Dan seems to be fading off into space at an alarming rate. Either that or the printer started running out of ink.

Painted Ruins

  1. Wasted Acres
  2. Mourning Sound
  3. Four Cypresses
  4. Three Rings
  5. Losing All Sense
  6. Aquarian
  7. Cut-Out
  8. Glass Hillside
  9. Neighbors
  10. Systole
  11. Sky Took Hold

Grizzly Bear Finally Return with New Single "Three Rings"

New Music, Music NewsWeston PaganoComment

We'll spare you the hibernation jokes and just get straight to it - Grizzly Bear are finally following up 2012's wondrous Shields five long years later, and you can hear the first single "Three Rings" now.

As always Ed Droste's vocals soothingly seduce, ushering in a track spinning in lush, ornate depth patiently building to a Daniel Rossen guitar climax that picks up right where "Sleeping Ute" left off.

Other than that we don't know much more yet (it appears even Grizzly Bear themselves were a bit surprised) as the Brooklyn quartet continues to play coy, but with an end product so reliably lovely we're happy to go along for the ride.